Saturday, January 18, 2014

näyttää - näkyä - nähdä - naida

If you don't have time to read the whole post, here's the idea in a nutshell: Pay very close attention to the pronunciation of näin, if you want to say I saw. It is awkwardly close to nain, which means I had sex. Here's the classic mistake:

  • Nain eilen Mattia. - I had sex with Matti yesterday.

Of course, it (probably) should be

  • Näin eilen Matin. - I saw Matti yesterday. 

These verbs are also often mixed:

näyttää, näytän, näytin, näyttänyt - to show something or to look like something

  • Sä näytät ihan sun äidiltä! - You look exactly like your mother!
  • Näytätkö mulle sun henkkareita? - Will you show me your ID?
  • Tämä näyttää pahalta. - This looks bad. 
  • Nyt näyttää siltä, että kohta sataa. - Not it looks like (it that) it will rain soon. (Notice the siltä before the että subclause.)

näkyä, näyn, näyin, näkynyt - to be seen, to be visible

  • Ilotulitus näkyy meille tosi hyvin. - You can see the fireworks really well from our place. (The fireworks are visible to our place.)
  • Näkyykö siellä ketään? - Can you see anybody there? (Is anyone seen there?)

nähdä, näen, näin, nähnyt - to see

  • Minä en näe sinua. - I don't see you. 
  • Näin sinut eilen keskustassa. - I saw you in the city center yesterday. 
  • Oletko nähnyt Villeä? - Have you seen Ville?

..and here's the one that you want to avoid:

naida, nain, nain, nainut  - to marry or to have sex

  • Haluan naida sinut. - I want to marry you. (sort of old-fashioned)
  • Haluan naida sinua. - I want to have sex with you. (vulgar) 

I've actually heard someone saying Oli kiva, että pomo nai minua  when she should have said Oli kiva, että pomo näki minut.  Also, an urban legend tells about a foreign boyfriend trying to have a small talk with his future in-laws by saying Minä nain eilen poroja

Notice that to get married is usually mennä naimisiin. A wedding is häät, although my 3-year-old daughter likes to used the horrible word naimisjuhlat. 




No comments:

Post a Comment