Friday, September 5, 2014

kin - kaan - kään

The enclitic particle kin means too, also. You can add it to almost any word, but notice how the meaning  of the sentence changes:

  • Minä juon kahvia. - I'll drink some coffee.
  • Minäkin juon kahvia. - Me too, I'll also drink some coffee.
  • Minä juon kahviakin. - I will drink also coffee. (In addition to something else.)

When added to a verb, the meaning is not also, but more like a small surprise:

  • Minä juon teetä. Ei, minä juonkin kahvia. - I'll drink some tea. No, I'll drink some coffee instead. 

In negative sentences, use kaan or kään according to the rules of vowel harmony.

  • Minä en juo teetä. - I don't drink tea.  
  • Minäkään en juo teetä. - Me neither, I don't drink tea. 
  • Minä en juo kahvia enkä juo teetäkään. - I don't coffee and I don't drink tea either.
  • Minä juon teetä. Tai ei, minä en juokaan teetä. - I'll drink some tea. Or no, I won't drink any tea after all. 

In case you wonder about the future and present tenses:

  • Minä juon nyt teetä. - I'm drinking tea now. 
  • Minä juon teetä. - I drink tea. (In general)
  • Minä juon teetä. - I'll drink tea. 

Notice that you can also express frustration with kin:

  • Oli tämäkin päivä! - What a (horrible) day this was!

2 comments:

  1. So it's completely fine to not indicate something is in the future by adding indicator words, and hope that the context will make it clear in the situation? Something simple for once!! =)

    ReplyDelete
  2. If you want to make the future more clear, you could add "tulen": "Minä tulen juomaan teetä" - "I will drink tea". Of course it can also mean "I'm coming to drink tea" so :P ("Tulevaisuus" - "Future")

    ReplyDelete